How do we end this corruption?

#IndiaAgainstCorruption           #demonitization-will-end-corruption!

Below pictures capture the open loot and waste of public money that is being carried out across Mumbai in brazen public view. Footpath after footpath is seeing this.

The current type of paver blocks in perfectly usable condition are being removed and the new square kind are being put. A footpath which could have easily lasted for five more years is pulled apart.

More than the functioning of the BMC it is an insight into the poor capability of citizens even after so many years at being able to intervene in the simplest of public issues.

Not just waste of public money this is a waste of precious natural resources. If not those in the India Against Corruption side then those who fight for the environment and sand mining and forests etc. should have been moved by the sight of what is going on and done something. People move across the city with a smooth glazed vision.

It is easier to talk about big scams because then you have to only speak and do nothing. Or talk about big issues like the Shivaji statue because then you are flowing with the flow and part of the latest fad and talking point.

I used to scoff at those who participated in IAC in Mumbai, the idea of Jan Lokpal Bill, the naive enthusiasm around Anna Hazare. I would then challenge people to look into just MCGM and apply their energies there than the national level. The movement was another instance of flowing with the latest fad. Few of the people who participated have any self ability to address any issue (hyperlocal) or provide their energy and resource for anything which is not a national talking point.

Now the fad is demonetization will knock the wind out of corruption. Sure. Whats happening on the footpaths is plain blatant corruption in front of naked eyes, not hidden away. Whether the paver blocks or the grills, a whole racket within BMC is siphoning of public money through these expenditures, from politicians to officials and of course the contractor is only the medium who gets his commission for doing all the dirty work.

How will demonetization knock the wind of this corruption?

Let BJP leaders beginning from the PM and CM (since there is much agreement there that demonetization is the solution to corruption) swear on the Gita (Mein Gita ki saugandh kha kar…) or on an idol of Ram or on the shivling that none in the ranks of BJP has benefitted from these fake and shabby contracts?

Mumbai Metro – Citiflo integration

The image below appeared in Times of India on 23rd March, 2016

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There will be difficulties in the success of the partnership between Mumbai Metro and bus aggregator Citiflo. The same obsacles which plague BEST buses and rickshaws will also affect the Citiflo operations leading to financial stress. No doubt Citiflo must have done its calculations but the moot point to observe in the information provided in image above is that a distance of 5kms is proposed to be covered in 30-40 mins i.e a speed of 10kmph or less. This is the same problem affecting BEST buses, they cannot turn around fast enough are spending most of their time idling in traffic, which is what the Citiflo buses will also do. Of course the passengers will be sitting in air-conditioned comfort, while still wasting as much of their time.

The objective has to be to make sure that a distance of 5 kms is covered in less than 15mins and the solution is to create new road(s) to access the hinterland consisting of Chandivali and Powai and to reduce load on the ridiculously overloaded Saki Vihar Road.

The low rise slum pockets which carpet between Saki Naka station and Subhash Nagar/Asalpha Station need to be the focus of attention and have indeed been so. Last year in September some of us were invited to view this presentation which had Asalpha as a case study.

The image below will help highlight the situation. Three placemarks to focus on – Asalpha Metro Station, Nahar Amrut Shakti Colony and the commercial complex called Boomerang. The straight red line between Asalpha and Nahar measures 800 meters. That is all that the distance is, which normally would get covered in 5 mins. But currently Nahar Complex has to be approaced via Saki Vihar Road and Saki Naka Station, doubling the distance and the time taken during peak hour congestion can easily be 20-30 mins.

All that is needed is a straight road to be developed from Asalpha Metro Station to Nahar Amrut Shakti. Beyond this there are existing roads connecting to Chandivali and Powai. The road should have a minimum of 15 feet wide footpaths on both sides, thus enabling those staying in Nahar Complex to just walk to Asalpha Station.

Even streamlining the existing Kherani Road can offer immediate relief. Kherani Road during peak hours is a sad sight to see and speaks volumes of the neglect of urban planning and the complete lack of compasion and vision within the city to offer the most simplest of solutions to its citizens.

Asalpha1

A close up image

Asalpha2

None of this is unsurmountble, even as the dense cluster of slums may look intimidating. With the right planners and adminstrators 2-3  years maximum. In a better governed city this would have been made mandatory on Nahar Developers to create such a road before undertaking any construction on their site.

But such kind of thinking and work draws no interest from anybody but the planners and those who are into advocacy. Companies like Mumbai Metro and Citiflo have their immediate balance sheets to look into and the commuters whose problems they (and activists) are trying to solve are plugged into FM Radio or playing video games on the phones. Most of them do not even read such news reports.

Why the Bombay HC order banning construction is stupid

The Bombay High Court has again passed some kind of an order prohibiting the municipal corporation from giving permissions for construction of any new building because of its inability to handle the waste crisis being faced by Mumbai. The media will be reluctant to capture my thoughts in quotes but I do have the freedom (hopefully and the tolerance of the Judges) to say it on my own blog post that the court order is totally stupid. It might have been passed with some other purpose in mind but not for solving the waste issue.

There is no relationship between additional construction and the current waste management crisis. Managed well, even if the garbage generated doubles there would still be no need for the current type of dumping grounds and only a fraction of land required for a single scientific land fill. To re iterate, if today Mumbai is generating 10,000 tonnes of waste and we have a crisis, then handled my way ( yes I will say my way) Mumbai can generate 20,000 tonnes of waste per day and I will assure closure of Deonar by 2020 and lush green parks and playgrounds on the same site by 2030. Let the buildings keep coming up and generating more waste. Open challenge to the Bombay HC and MCGM.

If I can show you ten buildings which are not sending any waste to Deonar today then I can very easily (with resources which are all being charred by MCGM currently) make 100,000 buildings also not send any waste to Deonar or any other dump. That is the key aspect, which makes the current order look so stupid.

If there is a ONE BIG co-relation it is between the failure of the Bombay HC in carrying out contempt proceedings for non-compliance of grand orders passed on waste management issues in the past 15 years by its own self. Something tells me that it would be expecting too much for the Judges or the Court to be doing that. If only the Judges who have passed this order, studied orders passed by their predecessors over the past 10-15 years – and more notably those by Justice Chandrachud and decided to initiate contempt proceedings against all the IAS officers who have handled or currently handle the relevant departments then it would have made more impact.

Just when did we last see the Court prosecute any senior official or politicians for any of its PIL orders in the past? PILs have become a joke. Only blind worshiping bhakts of the judicial system have faith in PILs because their blind belief enables them to not stray their looks and look at the reality.

Fine non-complying buildings Rs. 3000 for every instance of non-segregation back to back and the most stubborn and wealthy of buildings will end up complying. If MCGM is incapable, incompetent or insincere in implementing MSW 2000 then let them say so, let the Court take cognizance of it and lets talk ahead. But lets not waste time with these kind of stupid orders. Have a look at this public advertisement by MCGM in 2001 here

Materials below for those who might have missed them before or those whose eyes only keep glazing over all the evidence.

What a zero waste building looks like at this link

Suggestions to the MCGM for SWM in DP 2014 at this video

Points made during deposition on Coast Road Project in Mumbai

Independent Peoples Tribunal for Environment organised a Public Hearing on Mumbai Coast Road. The public notice for the same is at the end of my deposition.

Below are the points I submitted in my written deposition. I made a separate set of points in my spoken deposition, which is found in this presentation.

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Deposition before Commissioners by Rishi Aggarwal
Friday, 9th October, 2015
Mumbai
—————————————————————————————————————-

I would like to place the following points on record for the consideration of the Commissioners with regards to my objection to the coastal road project proposed by the MCGM and supported by the state and national governments. The project in my opinion is symptomatic of bad governance and my points below argue against the project on governance grounds.

I am an environmental and civic issues activist for the past 15 years and have been closely involved with impacting numerous issues which would lead to a better quality of life in Mumbai. I take keen interest and involve myself on a continuous basis with aspects related to the good governance of Mumbai. I have been opposing the coast road since early 2011 when it was first proposed and have been expressed my views at numerous governmental and public forums till now.

I am attaching two different letters sent by me regarding the same and also a petition which I started in 2013 against the project. Some key points are below

Points for deposition

1. It pains me that a few politicians have chosen in their wisdom to call the coast road project as one of national importance. The lifeline of Mumbai, the suburban railway network carries 8 million people daily, it is a global marvel. Almost ten people lose their lives daily on this network. I would imagine that a project of national importance would be to find a solution to put a complete stop to these deaths. This would confirm with the tenets of good governance. The coastal road project will make absolutely no difference to the conditions on the suburban system or to saving the lives of those who die on it every day.

As per estimates the coastal road would have a capacity of transporting a maximum of 300,000 people every day (with a lot of doubt) as compared to the 8 million on the suburban system. The coastal road project has been projected to cost Rs. 13,000 crore in 2015 costs. A reasonable level of improvements in various aspects of the suburban system would cost less than Rs. 1000 crores from what I gather through various readings in the papers and official reports.

So it is a situation where there is enormous enthusiasm in the government to spend Rs. 13000 crores on transporting 300,000 people daily but almost zero enthusiasm in spending Rs. 1000 crores on improving a system which is transporting 8 million people daily. How can this be justified on a good governance parameter? Would not a government interested in delivering good governance have a balanced approach?

2. The National Urban Transport Policy 2006 by the Government of India explicitly states that the focus and priority of transport policies and investments in Indian cities should be to move people not cars. For a decade and more we have only seen a violation of that policy in Mumbai. Having received no resistance MCGM became brazen and has leapfrogged but not in the way the NUTP would expect.

3. The land use and mobility patter in Mumbai has undergone a drastic change in the past three decades. A large number of people who work in Greater Mumbai need not be staying within. These are people staying with other municipal corporations within the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR). Mobility, residence and work patterns increasingly have an inter-regional pattern and our transport planning has not kept pace with the requirements. Multi-modal integration is still not convenient in the region. For these purposes development of functional Unified Metropolitan Transport Authority (UMTA) has been suggested for Mumbai for very long. Robust institutions as we know are the fundamental tenet of good governance.

Again the government has shown abysmal commitment to establish an UMTA for MMR. Enthusiasm for the coast road by releasing full page advertisements, carpeting the city skyline with self-congratulatory messages on hoardings has been there for all to see. The same politicians and administration shows a zero concern for addressing the day to day mobility challenges faced by millions in the region.

4. The coastal road proponent – the MCGM – is offering the coastal road project as a solution to the traffic congestion being faced in Mumbai. A city the size of Mumbai and with intentions of becoming world class does not see a functional and well equipped transport and traffic planning cell within itself. It is unimaginable a megapolis of this size in the developed world to not have a well functioning traffic and transport planning cell in its local self government.

The coastal road report alludes to the presence of similar roads in developed countries and uses them to build a case for the coastal road. But what about a traffic cell, which is a fundamental requirement if you want to handle traffic congestion? Why no interest in having a traffic cell? All of these world class cities have world class traffic monitoring departments staffed with the best trained staff and with budgets and facilities to match. There is an unmistaken sincerity in the way some of these global cities are governed, which is woefully missing from the governance of Mumbai.

Is the coast road a case of having cake when we do not even have bread?

End of deposition

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Public Notice about the Public Hearing

INDEPENDENT PEOPLE’S TRIBUNAL ON ENVIRONMENT
Public Hearing on Mumbai Coast Road

Organiser: Human Rights Law Network, Mumbai

Date: Friday, 9 October 2015.

Registration: 9.30 am; Tribunal hearings commence: 10am

Venue: St Paul’s Institute of Communication Education (SPICE)

The Independent People’s Tribunal on Environment aims to conduct fair and credible investigations focusing on issues concerning human rights and environmental justice and give voice to the struggles of grassroots organizations and affected communities.

We are setting up a Public Hearing to deliberate the feasibility of the proposed highway on the Rs 12,000 crore, 35-km long Coast Road on the western sea front of Mumbai that will connect Kandivali to Nariman Point on Friday October 9, from 10 AM to 6 PM.

At the Public hearing persons from various backgrounds ranging from the fishing communities, architects, town planners, governance, environmentalists and experts will be deposing on the effects of the coast road on the environment, fishing communities and on the financial viability of the project.

Justice (Retd.) Hosbet Suresh, former Bombay High Court Judge; D.M. Sukthankar and Jamsheed Kanga (former Municipal Commissioners); D.T. Joseph (former Urban Development Secretary); B.C. Khatua, Director of the Mumbai Transformation Support Unit (MTSU, a parastatal body); Gerson da Cunha, Action for Governance & Networking in India (AGNI); Shirish Patel, civil engineer and one of the three proponents of Navi Mumbai; Shabana Azmi, actor and activist; Prof V. Subramanyan, former IIT-Mumbai geologist; Sunil Shanbag, theatre director; Rambhau Patil, President, Maharashtra Machhimar Kruti Samiti; Dr Rakesh Kumar, Chief Scientist, in charge of National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) in Mumbai; Ajit Ranade, economist, Nikhil Wagle, journalist, Major General S. C. N. Jattar, President, Nagrik Chetna Manch and Meenakshi Menon, media and communications expert and founder of Vanashakti NGO, are Commissioners.

Address: Third Floor, St Paul’s Institute of Communication Education (SPICE), TPS III, Near Tawa Restaurant, Opp. Duruelo Convent High School, Road Number 24, Bandra (West), Mumbai – 400050
Phone:022 2643 5709

The event is open to the public, who can also send written submissions to the Commissioners during the day’s proceedings.

We look forward to full coverage by the print and electronic media.
A PRESS CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT 1.30PM ACROSS THE HALL ON THE 3RD FLOOR
Anne Thomas Panicker,
Human Rights Law Network (HRLN),
First Floor, Jalaram Krupa, Janmabhoomi Marg, Fort, Mumbai – 400001
Tel: +91-22-2282 0109/2282 0192; 98924 61119 Email: mumbai@hrln.org

Work Area Management 1

I have been talking on the need for a Work Area Management policy for Mumbai/MMR for very long and this is my first or so blog post. The government needs to look into the enormous inconvenience faced by people during civil works. Every year has some new requirement, utilities have to be laid, roads have to be repaired or remade. Dust, labour standards, noise, materials management are the four key components and every civic contract (using tax payers money) should abide by policy guidelines.

Two weeks back I raised alarm over the shocking levels of dust from the Marine Drive resurfacing and captured it in a video here, sent a letter and the issue was covered in a newspaper article as well. The video link is here

Marine Drive ToI article Marine Drive dust letter MCGM

The experience captured in pics below is from today. The whole Horniman Circle is being relaid, paver blocks being scooped out and asphalt coming in place. Pictures are below.

Following stands out

1. The existing paver block surface is/was exceptionally good. The case for asaphalt is valid but then paver block surfaces, which are laid out well (and have good ride quality) should be replaced only when the quality starts wearing out. There are hundreds of junctions which are in a bad condition in the city and priority suggests that they should be attended to first.

2. The high level of traffic chaos is evident. The photos do not capture the incessant honking by the vehicles. This leads to point 4.

3. There are high dust levels on the road which is then blown up due to cars and pedestrians entering local establishments as well.

4. The whole work can clearly be carried out in the night since this is a purely commercial area with no residential population which would face disturbance. Work should be carried out in phases and minimal work during day time. The Additional Municipal Commissioner in charge of roads has in one of the news articles remarked that “….constructing or improving roads in Mumbai is like performing a heart surgery on a man who is refusing to even lie down.” There are enough locations where the complete work can be completed between 11pm- 7am. The processes and technology in use currently is clearly outdated and from an altogether different era.

Below is the chaos left over from the Reliance JIO optic fibre work across the city. Every road and by lane has this kind of a scene. I lodged a complaint on 1916 10 days bak but only got a complaint number and no redressal.

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Below is an electricity cable being laid at 9:30 am at junction of S V Road and Amboli i Andheri (W). The work took up almost one lane. Being peak hour it lead to traffic pile up on all sides. Again should be done at night or between 6-8 am.

BEST Amboli-SV Road 2 BEST Amboli-SV Road

Coast Road diary

18.01.2015

Today I spent time trying to understand what will be the capacity to transport of the coast road project.The 128 odd km train network transports 7 million people everyday. 4000 BEST buses running on whatever number of route kms transport 4 million people. Similarly the 36km coast road, how many people will it transport?

For example if the project is 36 kms long and has four lanes and if each lane is 3.5 meters wide then we have a conveyor belt whose total area will be

For one kilometer

1000 meters into 14 meters = 14000 sq.mtrs.

For 36kms

14000 x 36kms = 504000 sq mtrs.

Now if each car(to begin with only cars) is occupying 25 sq. mtrs of space then we can have 504000/25 = 20160 cars on this conveyor belt – two lanes are for south and two for north.

Now if these lanes are moving at a consistent speed of 50kmph then how many vehicles pass through in an hour? How many people (depending on vehicle type, single person driving a car or a bus full of people) would be transported in an hour? How many in a day.

I checked the coast road report and realised that the dimensions of the road are much more

Widths of coast road

We will see a total road width of 36ms so the above calculation changes to

1000 x 36 = 36000 sq. mtrs.

For 36 kms

36000 x 36 = 1296000 sq mtrs area

And 1296000/25 = 51840 cars

Subsequently I decided to check up on google and found this useful document – technical paper from Transport for London on the same subject. Though the document has not given the answer it has all the correct formulae and principles to be followed. Now hopefully I will be able to with the assistance of more trained people be able to ascertain how many people will be able to flow in the peak directions on the coast road.

My concern is that as per the coast road they are providing 18 meters of road in each direction which is 60 feet wide. I do not see any road along the west coast which is 60 feet wide – one side? Everybody moving on the coast road has to join the mainland sometime and when four lanes converge into less than two lanes like in Bandra and Juhu and Andheri then will that not lead to traffic backing up on the coast road? Leading to traffic jams transferring from the internal city roads to the coast road?

Inputs to BMC Solid Waste Management five year vision plan – Swacch Mumbai

In November 2014 The Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai – MCGM or also BMC – invited citizens who have been involved with the solid waste management issue to contribute to a five year vision plan that they are developing to address Mumbai’s waste management. The following message was received in my inbox.

Sir,
In response to Hon. Prime Minister of India’s call for “Swachcha Bharat” at the launch of this ambitious nation-wide programme on 2nd October, 2014, MCGM intends to prepare a comprehensive five year action plan about cleanliness and sanitation for the entire city of Mumbai under “Swaccha Mumbai Abhiyaan”. 
In view of the same, suggestions are requested from different stakeholders. We are aware that your organization plays an important role in tackling various issues related to urban solid waste management and is actively working in your field of expertise.
We would welcome if your organization could share its expertise in form of views/suggestions/recommendations for developing a vision document for Clean Mumbai. We will take into consideration your valuable inputs/suggestions and draft an action plan to achieve total cleanliness in the city by 2019.

Regards,

Office of Chief Engineer (Solid Waste Management)
89, Love Grove Complex,
Dr. Annie Besant Road,
Worli- 400018
In response I put in the email copied below in italics with this attachment MCGM Budget for decentralised SWM. The sheet in the PDF document is work in progress but my reading is that for Rs, 30 crores such a setup can work very well and the BMC should absolutely invest in such an initiative. Like I have been continuously saying that there is no rocket science at all in waste management. One of the biggest components is training, education, awareness and enforcement all of which is human resource intensive.
BMC is wasting crores of public money on corrupt transportation contracts which are meant for siphoning of public money and create the problem of garbage dumps but is not willing to spend on hand holding and training of people. Every European and North American country has spent enormously on capacity building to achieve the great cleanliness standards that they have.  If you still haven’t seen the Satyamev Jayate episode please do here for some more insight.

Dear Sir/Madam,

Thank you for providing the opportunity to contribute to the process of developing a vision document for Clean Mumbai. I apologise for the delay since I was very busy. I have following three specific suggestions which the BMC should consider for implementation.

1) Create budget to hire dedicated human resource for supporting segregation
As a country we are acutely aware of the need to reduce the amount of waste that goes to dumping grounds and to take all necessary measures to achieve the same. The issue has been taken cognizance of adequately by various statutory institutions of the country – the Supreme Court, Parliament and urban local bodies. And yet we are seeing that in Greater Mumbai ever greater amounts of waste is being sent to dumping grounds.

We can only transform our good intentions into outcomes if we allocate human and financial resources in the right direction. We need to demonstrate that we are sincere and serious about reducing waste going to dumping grounds and are not just giving it lip service. Towards that end please find attached a spreadsheet drawing out a proposal to create the necessary budget for hiring the right human resource for undertaking activities and education which will show definite reduction in waste going to dumping grounds.

The spread sheet is still in draft stage and meant to give an idea. One manager per ward and 10 communicators/specialists per ward should be hired. Those numbers are presented. I will be happy to detail and contribute further when the idea find support conceptually. This in my list is the most important step which teh MCGM needs to undertake.

2) Creating an R&D and social entrepreneur support Budget

We need to create and R&D and innovation support fund in the budget. Grants need to be made available to SWM entrepreneurs to try out their projects. This will make available over the years a rich bank of practical knowledge about what is working and not working. I propose that Rs. 5 crores be kept aside in the SWM budget for such activity and a committee of known experts and practioners be formed to scrutinise and approve the proposals.
3) Create physical space for decentralised SWM
In the DP meetings earlier this year the most emphatic suggestion we made was the create space within the city for decentralsied solid waste management activities. The corporation needs to urgently create at least one more per ward dry waste collection and sorting centres like the one successfully running in Juhu, operated by Ragini Jain on BMC plot of about 10000sft. Once the space is provided the entrepreneur is able to set up support infrastructure like van for dry waste collection, administrator etc. setting in place a positive cycle and reduced waste going to dumping grounds.
Thank you once again for the opportunity and I will appreciate if MCGM comes back with comments on my suggestions and decides to incorporate these.

Regards,

Rishi Aggarwal

Research Fellow

Observer Research Foundation Mumbai

Would be happy to hear from you in the form of comments or email me. Please do share as well if you consider relevant.